Family Court Filing Fee Increases

Family Court Filing Fee Increases

The Ontario Government recently increased the filing fees which are necessary to file certain Applications in Family Court in the Province. As of April 1, 2019, there are over 70 fee changes, ranging from small increases to changes that double the costs of certain services, particularly in Family Court matters. In this blog post, Fresh Legal lawyer, Jillian Allen, outlines some of these increases and how they affect your Family Court matter.

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Moving After Separation: Tips from a Pro

Moving After Separation: Tips from a Pro

Moving is stressful at the best of times. When you add the stress of a separation on top, it can be downright overwhelming. Once you’ve found a new home, the actual process of moving all your things begins - but where do you start? To help you out with moving and moving on after your separation, we asked Lisa Robinson from Streamline Relocation Services to share her tips to make your move less stressful by planning ahead.

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We Need to Talk About Our "Relationship"... The Solicitor-Client Relationship

We Need to Talk About Our "Relationship"... The Solicitor-Client Relationship

Are you going to tell my wife that I’m here? Do I need to tell my husband that I’m meeting with you? The above questions are surprisingly common when I meet with a client for the first time. My answer is always, “No, not unless you want me to!?”. With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, this post will take you to the heart of the relationship between a client and their lawyer.

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Property Division: Equalization and The Family Law Act

Property Division: Equalization and The Family Law Act

All married couples in Ontario already have a “prenup” - the law in place that sets out what happens to your property when they separate. As soon as you get married, you “opt in” to this process. Under the terms of this “prenup”, you may have to share the entire value of a home you brought into your relationship, share your business, and share inheritances and gifts. You can contract out of this “prenup” by getting your own.

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Spousal Support: Retirement and Pension Income

Spousal Support: Retirement and Pension Income

A rising trend in family law is the phenomenon known as “grey divorces”: older couples separating after a long-term marriage. But how much support is a spouse obligated to provide when retirement is one or two chapters away and the ability to “turn over a new page” becomes significantly harder? In a previous post, we shared a primer on spousal support. In this post, Daniel Duyvelshoff, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, discusses the role of pensions in grey divorce support obligations.

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Marriage vs. Common Law Relationships: Moving In Together

Marriage vs. Common Law Relationships: Moving In Together

If you and your partner are cohabiting, or planning on doing so, there are some legal issues that you should consider, including whether you should get a cohabitation agreement to protect both you and your partner’s interests should one of you pass away or should the relationship end. In this post we will discuss the issues that may arise when cohabiting, and how a cohabitation agreement can assist in preventing complications before they arise.

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Finances: Tips for Completing Your Financial Statement

Finances: Tips for Completing Your Financial Statement

The Financial Statement can be overwhelming when you first look at it, but is not as hard to fill out as it seems on first glance.  Before you start, find your latest paystub, your income tax returns and Notices of Assessment, and your bank statements and other financial documents from around the time of your separation.  Take a deep breath and tackle one part at a time. As you fill it out, here are some tips and answers to common questions.

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Stay At Home Parents: What are my rights when we separate?

Stay At Home Parents: What are my rights when we separate?

When one spouse is able to build up savings, work experience, assets, and other benefits from working, the law recognizes that the other spouse may have contributed to these things.  If you were married, the division of your property is based in part on this assumption.  The law does differ if you were married or living together, but in either case you will be requesting similar things - a share of property, and support for you and your children.

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