Spousal Support: Retirement and Pension Income

Spousal Support: Retirement and Pension Income

A rising trend in family law is the phenomenon known as “grey divorces”: older couples separating after a long-term marriage. But how much support is a spouse obligated to provide when retirement is one or two chapters away and the ability to “turn over a new page” becomes significantly harder? In a previous post, we shared a primer on spousal support. In this post, Daniel Duyvelshoff, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, discusses the role of pensions in grey divorce support obligations.

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Court Procedure: Service by Facebook

Court Procedure: Service by Facebook

Social media is beginning to change the traditional practices of the legal system. Some uses of social media in legal system may be obvious: for example, using Facebook to collect evidence, or how oversharing on social media can have legal consequences. In recent Ontario court cases, however, social media has been used for a less obvious purpose: serving documents.  In this post,  Olivia Giacobbi, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, discusses service by social media.

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Social Media and Divorce: Possible Impacts on Your Separation

Social Media and Divorce: Possible Impacts on Your Separation

A growing way to find divorce evidence is social media. Being mindful of what you post before, during, and after a proceeding could improve your chances of an agreeable outcome.  In a previous post, we shared some quick tips about using social media during a divorce.  In this post,  Olivia Giacobbi, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, discusses some ways social media can impact your divorce.

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Social Media and Divorce: Quick Tips

Social Media and Divorce: Quick Tips

Divorcing spouses should be cautious of their social media activity. Though sharing moments of our lives has become part of our modern culture, is it important to remember that posts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and any other social networking sites can have legal ramifications. In this post, Olivia Giacobbi, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, shares some tips for using social media when going through a separation.

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Custody and Access: Stepparent Applications

Custody and Access: Stepparent Applications

We have previously written about grandparent access and the impact of recent amendments to the Children's Law Reform Act (CLRA). Recently, an Ontario case explored the issue of step-parent access. Unlike grandparents, step-parents are not specifically named in the CLRA.  However, they do have status in custody and access applications. In this post, Olivia Giacobbi, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, reviews the case of Agmon v. James and stepparent access generally.

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Proposed Changes to the Divorce Act, Part 2

Proposed Changes to the Divorce Act, Part 2

In this post, Ainsley Shannon, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, reviews the changes related to relocating with a child after separation. The law on relocation as it currently follows the Supreme Court decision in Gordon v Goertz. Bill C-78 codifies and adds to these factors, including a notice provision, a burden of proof, and sharing access costs. This means that should Bill C-78 pass, it will impose a legislative framework for relocation that does not currently exist.

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Proposed Changes to the Divorce Act, Part 1

Proposed Changes to the Divorce Act, Part 1

On May 22, 2018, Bill C-78 had its first reading. This bill proposes several changes to the Divorce Act and related legislation. In this post, Ainsley Shannon, a Fresh Legal intern from the University of Ottawa law school, reviews the changes related to the terminology for parenting after divorce and the best interests of the child. The bill also sets out a framework for parental relocation after a separation, which will be reviewed in Part 2 of this post.

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Court Procedure: Family Court vs. Small Claims

Court Procedure: Family Court vs. Small Claims

When starting a court proceeding related to an issue that stems from the breakdown of a relationship, most people will assume that they must bring their matter to the family courts. Sometimes, however, the matter can be brought as a civil claim in small claims court.  In this post, we will discuss the 2016 case of Pilon v. Lavigne 2016 ONSC 1965 and examine when matters should properly be brought in family court and when they should be brought in small claims court.

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